Stop the Meeting Madness

We’ve all been there before—a day of back-to-back meetings that leaves little time to answer your growing pile of emails, let alone begin any of the projects you’ve been meeting about all day. It’s enough to make you dizzy. Don’t misunderstand me, there’s certainly value in meetings—bringing together multiple perspectives to discuss projects and challenges in real-time, uncovering ideas and solutions that emerge from a group’s collaboration and collective energy. But sometimes we schedule meetings for the sake of meeting, relying on them for lack of efficient information sharing processes and technologies. With team members spread across Dolphin’s several offices around the globe, we’ve implemented a number of strategies to communicate and share information without formal meetings. For example:

  1. We use MS SharePoint to post and share files easily—among multiple computers and mobile devices as well as with other team members.
  2. Desktop sharing software like Team Viewer helps us review, discuss and collaborate on documents from our own desktops on the fly, train new team members and troubleshoot IT challenges as they occur without having to gather together in one room.
  3. We delegate action items and empower those closest to any given project to make decisions. This significantly cuts down on the need for group discussions.
Of course, there will always be major projects and decisions that necessitate meetings. In these instances, be sure to plan accordingly to get the most out of the time you invest together. Distribute an agenda before the meeting, complete with objectives for the discussion—preferably at least two hours prior so that attendees can prepare and gather their questions. Stick to the agenda throughout the meeting to keep participants on track and accomplish the goals you set. Always follow up with written notes that include attendee names, topics discussed and key decision points. The notes should also include an Actions/Next Steps section with clear responsibility assignments to aid in follow up and progress reporting. Bottom line, if you must meet, make it matter!

Back to Blog

Stop the Meeting Madness

We’ve all been there before—a day of back-to-back meetings that leaves little time to answer your growing pile of emails, let alone begin any of the projects you’ve been meeting about all day. It’s enough to make you dizzy.

Don’t misunderstand me, there’s certainly value in meetings—bringing together multiple perspectives to discuss projects and challenges in real-time, uncovering ideas and solutions that emerge from a group’s collaboration and collective energy. But sometimes we schedule meetings for the sake of meeting, relying on them for lack of efficient information sharing processes and technologies.

With team members spread across Dolphin’s several offices around the globe, we’ve implemented a number of strategies to communicate and share information without formal meetings. For example:

  1. We use MS SharePoint to post and share files easily—among multiple computers and mobile devices as well as with other team members.
  2. Desktop sharing software like Team Viewer helps us review, discuss and collaborate on documents from our own desktops on the fly, train new team members and troubleshoot IT challenges as they occur without having to gather together in one room.
  3. We delegate action items and empower those closest to any given project to make decisions. This significantly cuts down on the need for group discussions.

Of course, there will always be major projects and decisions that necessitate meetings. In these instances, be sure to plan accordingly to get the most out of the time you invest together. Distribute an agenda before the meeting, complete with objectives for the discussion—preferably at least two hours prior so that attendees can prepare and gather their questions. Stick to the agenda throughout the meeting to keep participants on track and accomplish the goals you set. Always follow up with written notes that include attendee names, topics discussed and key decision points. The notes should also include an Actions/Next Steps section with clear responsibility assignments to aid in follow up and progress reporting.

Bottom line, if you must meet, make it matter!